It's All Good

There are days when everything seems to go wrong. But fortunately, these are not very frequent. Most days, the "stuff that goes wrong" is peppered lightly through events of "really good stuff." On those days, the "stuff that goes wrong" is also known as "stuff that makes good stories to tell later."

For instance, one of Jabin's favourite tricks of late has been to put the end of the toilet paper in the toilet and flush. Repeatedly. So when I heard the sound of water running through the pipes while using the washroom myself this morning, I suspected that this is the activity I would find Jabin engaged in when I got out.

Unfortunately, I was wrong.

Since we are still renovating our "main bath", aka "the kids' bathroom," we have been giving the boys their baths in the only other bathtub in the house, which happens to be in our master bathroom. We keep their bath toys in a little mesh bag next to the toilet, for lack of a better place to store them. Well, apparently, in lieu of an actual bathtub full of water, the toilet is the next-best place to play with your bath toys.

(I wish I hadn't felt the urge to correct the little goober quite so instantaneously--had I had the presence of mind to grab the camera, that would have been a great one for the scrapbook!)

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While we were out getting groceries this afternoon, one of the store's employees was just putting out the Halloween costumes. While we don't "do" Halloween, this is a fantastic time of year to stock up on dress-up costumes fairly inexpensively--especially ones for boys. So, I let Jude and Noah each pick some "weapon sets" from a rack on the wall which were going cheap. Noah chose a knight's sword and arm guard set, and Jude chose a bow and arrow set.

As soon as we got home, Noah and Jabin both needed naps. So Jude and I headed out to the back yard and had a mini-archery lesson.

Don't raise your eyebrows at me. I'm not completely ignorant on the subject--my dad hand-made a bow and arrow each for my brother and me as kids, and then I actually took archery as a class one year at teen camp. I definitely had enough knowledge to get a four-and-a-half-year-old started on the basics--especially considering the suction-cup arrows and elastic-drawstring-cord "string" on the bow. He's got about as much knowledge now as will do him good, considering his equipment.

If he's still interested in the subject in a few years, we'll fork out for the real stuff--and some professional lessons.

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It struck me today that in one week's time, I will be the mother of a kindergartner. In a panic, I thought "I can't have a kid in school if I don't make some cookies!" There just seems to be something about being able to take some cookies in your lunch, or having some as a snack when you get home from school, that goes hand-in-hand with the very ritual of being in school, doesn't there? Am I alone on this?

Since our diet includes much fewer baked goods than it used to, I haven't ferreted out very many cookie recipes that fall within the guidelines we try to stay in. I will occasionally let the boys get an oatmeal-raisin cookie from Tim Horton's for a special treat, but rarely make up a batch of 3-4 dozen of the sugary temptations for us to glut ourselves on for a few days at home. However, I thought today I had better start practicing for having my biggest little man in school. And, lo and behold, I dug a treasure out of the recipe binder that, with a very minor modification, was perfect! Not too sugary, not too flour-y, and only a modest-sized batch. Plus, it is made mostly from yummy, good-for-you coconut!

So, now all I need to do is wait another year until Jude is actually going to be in school over lunchtime to make it! :-) (Just kidding.)

These super-fast cookies have only five ingredients and are almost as healthy as cookies can be! Not overly sweet.

Coconut Macaroons

Makes: about 2 dozen

1/3 cup whole wheat (or unbleached all-purpose) flour
2 1/2 cups unsweetened flaked or shredded coconut
1/8 tsp. ground sea salt
1 tbsp. maple syrup, plus enough full-fat coconut milk or whipping cream to make 2/3 cup
1 tsp. vanilla extract (sugar-free is best)

In a bowl, combine flour, coconut and salt. Add maple syrup and cream mixture and vanilla; mix well. (Batter will be stiff.) Drop by tablespoonfuls (I use a small scoop from Pampered Chef--a melon baller would also work) 1" apart on a greased baking sheet, or an ungreased well-seasoned stoneware pan (my recommendation). Bake at 350 degrees for about 15 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove to a wire rack to cool.

Alternatives: This cookie would be wonderful raw, as my taste-testing proved to me. I would skip the flour for that. To make it stick better, I would melt a little extra-virgin coconut oil or butter, (say, 2 tbsp.) until barely liquefied, mix it in at the very end, then chill the cookies once you have put them on the sheet. (If you make the raw version, you will probably want to store them in a sealed container in the refrigerator, as well. Not so much the send-it-in-your-lunch type of cookie.)

Things that could be added to this cookie, whether baked or raw:

  • sunflower seeds
  • chocolate chips
  • pumpkin seeds
  • flax seeds
  • sprouted grains, such as spelt or barley

At this point, you might want to start thinking of it more like a bite-sized granola bar!

Let me know if you try any of these variations, and I will also update this post as I try them to let you know the results!

And, after all these things I've posted about today (but most especially the cookies!), I can most definitely say It's all good!

The perfect bite-size tea pairing--a touch of sweetness without overwhelming. Guilt-free healthy Coconut Macaroons. #wholefoods